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    Post-Secondary Planning Guide

    9th Grade

    Students

    To Do:

    • Talk to your guidance counselor or teacher about Advanced Placement courses.  Find out what courses are available, whether you are eligible, and how to enroll in them.

     

    • Start planning for college and thinking about you career interests. 

                   - Useful sites:

    www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov/myfsa

    www.college.gov

    www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov

     

    • Make a list of your awards, honors paid or volunteer work, and extracurricular activities.  Consider participating in academic enrichment programs, summer workshops, and camps with specialty focuses such as music, arts, and science.

    Parents

    To Do:

    • Start researching how to meet those college expenses.

                 - Useful sites:

    www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov/myfsa

    www.college.gov

    www.ed.gov/parents

    • Make sure you are fully aware of the provisions of any college saving accounts you have opened for your child. 

     

    10th Grade

    Students

    To Do:

    • Meet with your school counselor to discuss colleges and their requirements.
    • Consider taking a practice Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT).
    • Plan to use your summer wisely: Work, volunteer, or take a summer course (away or at a local college).
    • Go to career information events to get a more detailed look at the career options.
    • Start looking into the difference between grants, loans, work-study and scholarships.

    Parents

    To Do:

    • Find out if your child has college or financial aid night. Plan to attend those events with your child.
    • Help your child develop independence by encouraging him or her to take responsibility for balancing homework with any other activities or a part-time job.
    • Learn about the standardized tests your child will be taking during 10th – 12th grades: PSAT/NMSQT, SAT (www.collegeboard.com) and/or ACT (www.act.org).
    • Start looking into financial aid.   

     

    11th Grade

    Students

    To Do:

    • Meet with your school counselor to discuss colleges and their requirements.
    • Consider taking a practice Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT).
    • Go to career information events to get a more detailed look at the career options.
    • Begin planning college visits.  Spring break is a good time to visit.  Try to visit college near you and include a large, medium size and a small campus.
    • Develop a preliminary list of colleges that interest you.  Start collecting information on each.
    • Start looking into the difference between grants, loans, work-study and scholarships.
    • Register for the ACT or SAT towards the end of the school year.
    • Start writing your accomplishments, activities, work experiences down so you have a record of them.  This information will be needed for your college applications.
    • Plan to use your summer wisely: Work, volunteer, or take a summer course (away or at a local college).

    Parents

    To Do:

    •  Find out if your child has college or financial aid night. Plan to attend those events with your child.
    • Help your child develop independence by encouraging him or her to take responsibility for balancing homework with any other activities or a part-time job.
    • Learn about the standardized tests your child will be taking during 10th – 12th grades: PSAT/NMSQT, SAT (www.collegeboard.com) and/or ACT (www.act.org).
    • Start looking into financial aid.

     

    12th Grade

    Students and Parents:

    2021-2023 Post Secondary Planning Guide

    Financial Aid Tips for Parents

     
     
     
     
Last Modified on January 31, 2022